Home
Amateur Radio
Scenarios
Audio Downloads
Audio Players
Video Vault
Dirty Tricks
Advice
AROS
The R.I.S.
Court Cases
Amateurs In Court
Pirates In Court
CB Court Cases
Other Court Cases
International Cases
Spot The Loony
Pirate Radio/UBR
Repeater Bomb
Laughing Boxes
Repeater Jammer
CTCSS Tones
New Phonetic Alphabet
Russian Jammers
RSGB Limited
Presscuttings
LPWS Magazines
Sing Along
History Of Swearing
LPWS FAQ
Construction
Raycom Ex Employees
Rodger's Archive
Terms Of Use

Pirate Radio Operators in Court

Here are a few of the press releases detailing the successful prosecution of pirate radio operators in the UK.

The work of The Radiocommunications Agency is now carried out by Ofcom.

Since Ofcom have taken over, they appear to operate a completely different policy when it comes to "boasting" about prosecutions. Apart from the number of these prosecutions dropping dramatically, the details rarely appear on the Ofcom website, previously, the RA could hardly wait to publish the details in the form of press releases, and gloat.

DTI Mission Statement:- In 1999 the Agency successfully prosecuted 47 people arising from their involvement with unlicenced broadcasting stations. Average fines, where imposed, were £229 and average costs awarded to the Agency were £307. The courts can also order all equipment to be forfeited. The Agency also carried out 1414 raids on 239 unlicenced broadcasting stations. 1218 of the raids were on 167 stations in the London area.

Below is another example of the Radiocommunications Agency claiming that broadcasts in FM on 88-108 Mhz can in some way interfere with emergency services and air traffic (which use AM anyway!). We have yet to see a SINGLE case where this has been proved or even been part of the official charges. These "scare mongering" tactics are used to gain sympathy from magistrates etc. as the chances of the DTI lying are impossible, unless you know differently like we do! [Westland, Iraqi Supergun etc.]
Also, in the 19 February press release, Ofcom Director of Field Operations, Robert Thelen-Bartholomew, is still under the misapprehension that transmissions on 88-108 MHz FM can somehow interfere with AM air traffic and the almost completely digital emergency services radio. Surely the time for relying on this old false claim has long since passed, even back in the 1970's it was a bit far fetched.

19 February 2008

Ofcom, police and London Boroughs take action against illegal broadcasting

Ofcom today announced the results of joint operations across four London boroughs to take illegal radio stations off the air.

Working in partnership with the London Boroughs of Hackney, Haringey, Tower Hamlets and Islington, as well as the Metropolitan Police, Ofcom’s team carried out enforcement action against over 20 illegal broadcasters in these areas.

Illegal broadcasters can cause interference to safety-of-life services, such as the fire brigade and air traffic control, as well as licenced broadcasters, denying listeners their choice of music and news. Illegal stations cause significant damage to rooftops, resulting in expensive repair bills at public expense.

Ofcom’s operation ran from 6 to 16 February and resulted in three arrests, one studio raid, the removal of 22 illegal broadcasters’ transmitters and over 20 letters sent to local night clubs that have advertised events on illegal radio stations.
Ofcom estimates that there are over 150 illegal stations operating in the UK, with half of those broadcasting across London and the South East. There are over thirty illegal stations across these four boroughs, making up 60% of all illegal broadcasters in North London.
Ofcom is responsible for keeping radio spectrum free from interference, taking illegal stations off the air by raiding studios and seizing and disconnecting transmitters and aerials. Last year, Ofcom carried out over 900 such operations and 37 people were convicted of offences related to illegal broadcasting.

Robert Thelen-Bartholomew, Director of Field Operations, said: "Illegal broadcasters can cause serious interference to safety-of-life services such as the fire brigade and air traffic control, as well as legitimate radio stations. Ofcom takes swift and firm action to remove these illegal stations from the air. We work closely with local authorities to ensure that this problem is tackled at source for the benefit of the community."
Councillor Terry Stacy, Islington Council's Executive Member for Housing and Communities, said: "Pirate radio stations are a menace and we are pleased to support this crackdown.
He added, “Islington Council is determined to stop illegal radio stations. Illegal broadcasters can put lives at risk by interfering with vital emergency equipment, damage council property and make the lives of our residents hell. Sometimes these stations are linked to drug-dealing and serious crime, which we will not tolerate.”

Councillor Nilgun Canver, Haringey’s cabinet member for enforcement and safer communities, said: “Pirate radio installations seriously damage our properties when they break locks and doors into stairwells to access the roofs of council flats from where they broadcast. We fully support this campaign to stop pirate radio and our enforcement team is keen to continue working with Ofcom to sort out this problem.”
London Borough of Tower Hamlets Pirate Radio Project Manager, Claire Demmel said, "In recent months Tower Hamlets Council and its partners have taken stringent security steps to prevent illegal broadcasters from gaining access to our roof tops. Joint operations such as this can only reinforce the message that we take radio piracy seriously.”

The illegal broadcasters targeted by the Ofcom operation include

Station Location
Attitude 107.4 FM Hackney
Bizim 104.2 FM Haringey
Conshus 106.9 FM Tower Hamlets
Heat 96.6 FM Haringey
Jiggy FM Haringey
Kasapa 104.0 FM Hackney
Kool 94.6 FM Tower Hamlets
Live 101.5 FM Tower Hamlets
Millennium Supreme 99.8 FM Tower Hamlets
Origin 95.2 FM Islington
Rude 88.2 FM Islington
Shine 87.9 FM Tower Hamlets
SLR 97.7 FM Haringey
Takeover 107.7 FM Hackney
Touch 94.0 FM Haringey
True 100.2 FM Hackney
Unidentified Station 102.6 FM Haringey
Xtreme 101.7 FM Haringey
18 September 2003

The battle against pirate radio stations received a boost today as new powers of arrest under the Communications Act came into force.

The police, working with Radiocommunications Agency investigators, will be able to arrest a pirate broadcaster or anybody suspected of supporting or facilitating illegal broadcasting. Previously police could only detain someone if they suspected them of giving a false name and address or another criminal act, such as a breach of the peace or assault.

The new powers of arrest will also extend to acts of deliberate interference with radio communications and hoax calls, especially false distress calls.

Communications Minister Stephen Timms said:

“These new powers will be an important weapon in the campaign against pirate broadcasters.

“By interfering with communications services which are vital for public safety, pirates can put lives at risk. They also cause interference with other licenced radio users and can be a social nuisance to those who live near pirate stations.”

The number of pirate broadcasters is declining whilst the prosecution rates are rising. Figures for 2002 showed a fall of 15% in the number of illegal stations whilst prosecutions more than doubled to 49, with a further 55 prosecutions so far in 2003. Pirates detained under these new powers could face an unlimited fine or up to two years in prison.

Wednesday December 18, 2002

The government has warned nightclubs' owners they could face stiff penalties if they host parties for pirate radio stations.
A club in Manchester cancelled a party for Buzz FM, a local pirate station, after receiving a warning from the Radiocommunications Agency (RA). According to the RA, between 80 and 100 pirate radio stations are operating in the UK at any one time putting lives at risk by interfering with air traffic and emergency frequencies.
Radio and Telecoms Minister Stephen Timms said: "Pirate broadcasters can cause problems for everybody. "Those who support them, by supplying premises or advertising with them, are just as bad. "We need to make sure that we protect the public from these risks, and cracking down on clubs that help the pirates is a vital part of this."

Notice the phrase "putting lives at risk by interfering with air traffic and emergency frequencies."
What air traffic or emergency communication is to be found between 88-108 MHz FM?
[Answer:- NONE]
Air Traffic uses AM, and emergency communications have mostly migrated to digital modes and in any case have not inhabited these frequencies for in excess of 15 years!

21 Year Old Woman Get's Her 'Udders Feeled

December 2009

Two pirate radio stations in Huddersfield, have been raided and shut down. Ofcom officials pulled the plug on Vibes and Frontline, which broadcast urban music. The two stations, which had to move premises frequently to avoid being caught, were tracked down by the communications industry regulator to adjacent properties in Almondbury. A 21-year-old woman was arrested.

Larry Stoddart, who was one of the pioneers of pirate radio in Huddersfield in the early 1990s, said about £5,000 or £6,000 of equipment, including transmitters, turntables and amplification equipment, was seized. He said: “Without pirate radio, it’s going to be a very sour Christmas. These are the only stations providing music that a lot of people want to listen to. Thousands of people listen to pirate radio. If they are using public money to hound pirate radio, it’s a total waste.”

The stations, which operated on FM frequencies 90.6 and 94.7, mainly played reggae, R ‘n’ B and soul and had been running for about four years. They transmitted primarily at weekends and survived thanks to revenue from advertising by small businesses and promoters of club nights. The man behind Vibes, known only as ‘The General’, has been involved in pirate radio for 20 years and has become a cult figure in the scene.

He said: “I feel rotten about it to be honest. “We give the community up to date information about what’s going on, and music that they want to listen to. We play what other radio stations aren’t playing.” But he vowed pirate radio would be back. “I’ve got plans,” he said.

Mr Stoddart, 45, said pirate radio helped to reach young people with important messages. He said: “Our main listeners are teenagers and we provide a lot of messages raising awareness of knife and gun crime, sexually transmitted infections and other issues. We are looking for some sort of legislation that would allow pirate radio to operate – maybe having one station per town or city. They say transmitting pirate radio could bring an aeroplane down, but so could a mobile phone.” He said there would be a campaign to bring pirate radio back.

An Ofcom spokesman said: “Ofcom can confirm that it has carried out a raid on two illegal pirate radio stations. Equipment was seized during the operation and is being retained as evidence. The investigation is ongoing.”

January 2010

Huddersfield pirate radio stations back on air after Ofcom bust

TWO pirate radio stations that were raided and closed down are back on the air. Frontline and Vibes, which broadcast to thousands of people in Huddersfield, were raided by communications industry regulator Ofcom early last month. Thousands of pounds worth of equipment, including transmitters, turntables and amplification equipment, was seized in the operation at properties in Almondbury.

But the two stations have been resurrected. Larry Stoddart, who was one of the pioneers of pirate radio in Huddersfield in the early 1990s, said they had come back on before Christmas. 
Well done Larry!

Pirate Rooftop Ban

28.09.2009

A man has been banned from every roof top in London after he pleaded guilty to installing pirate radio equipment on a tower block in the city.

Kieran O’Sullivan received the antisocial behaviour order (ASBO) following a successful prosecution by Ofcom.

He also received an 18 week custodial sentence suspended for 12 months, a three month curfew, a £1,200 fine, and had his radio equipment seized.
Ofcom worked with Camden Council and police to secure the prosecution following complaints from residents about Freeze FM operating from estates in Hampstead.

Emergency services

Residents had complained about pirate radio operators using roof tops to install equipment, which caused a nuisance to residents and damaged council property.
Pirate radio stations are a particular problem in big cities, particularly London, Birmingham, Leeds and Manchester.
They can create serious consequences by interfering with the communications systems used by the ambulance, fire and police services, as well as air traffic control.
For example, their illegal broadcasts can cause problems for fire engines trying to speak to their control rooms – which could then cause serious delays in getting to fires.
[COBBLERS! Emergency services have been digital for years, no interference is possible]

Cooperman Is A Bit Of A Kent

Confession leads to 150 days Jail!

September 2009

Pirate radio man jailed following security scare

A Kent man whose pirate radio equipment sparked a security scare has been jailed following a prosecution by Ofcom.

James Cooper, 28, of Chatham, Kent admitted to supplying certain pieces of equipment – two metal boxes, a laptop computer and an aerial – which was hidden on top of a water tower in the town.
But when a water engineer stumbled upon the equipment in July 2009, he reported the suspect packages to police.
With the water tower on a list of possible terrorism targets, and with police unable to identify the equipment, an Army ordnance disposal team was called in.
Homes were evacuated and a 50-metre cordon was put in place so Army experts could carry out the controlled explosion.

Controlled explosion

Homes were evacuated and a busy road shut while a controlled explosion was carried out. Cooper then called police to tell them he used the equipment to web-stream his pirate radio station – Rewind FM – and he was subsequently arrested.

The matter was passed to Ofcom and Cooper was jailed for 150 days at Medway Magistrates Court after pleading guilty to offences under Section 35 and 38 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act.
All of Cooper’s other pirate radio equipment was also forfeited to Ofcom.

Emergency services

As well as drowning out legitimate radio stations, pirate radio broadcasts can create serious consequences by interfering with the communications systems used by the ambulance, fire and police services, as well as air traffic control.
For example, their illegal broadcasts can cause problems for fire engines trying to speak to their control rooms – which could then cause serious delays in getting to fires.
OFCOM is responsible for tackling illegal broadcasting and we monitor the airwaves 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and work closely with the police to crackdown on the problem.
This involves raiding studios and taking them off air, seizing equipment and bringing the culprits to court. It’s important to remember that anyone involved with illegal broadcasting is committing an offence.
That includes someone who allows their premises to be used or advertises on a station.

 

COMMENT  It's a pity he owned up to being responsible, apart from getting banged up for 150 days, he has set a precedent now in what is known as "Case Law", anyone else caught doing anything similar will have the sentence Cooper received read out in court as an example of past consequences. This is reproduced from an OFCOM press release, you will see that they still seem to be unaware that Fire, Police & Ambulance now use digital communications, and that Air Traffic Control are on vastly different frequencies AND in AM (not FM as pirate radio broadcasts). The usual lies being used to worry the Magistrates, really underhanded practice from the "Authority" that knows the actual facts!
It seems that OFCOM are now following in the footsteps of The Radiocommunications Agency, who regularly trotted out this sort of thing in court cases.

OFCOM Awoken

After a couple of years with virtually no published prosecutions, Ofcom appear to have started following in the footsteps of the RIS

03/11/05

Ofcom tackles illegal broadcasting

Ofcom today announced the results of an operation to take off air illegal broadcasters operating in Greater London.

The operation began on the morning of Saturday 29 October to deal with the large number of London pirate radio stations that illegally broadcast over the FM radio band without a licence under Section 1 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949.

The operation has led to:-

53 illegal broadcasters' radio transmitters seized;
17 transmitters and aerials disabled;
43 mobile and land line telephone numbers linked to illegal broadcasting operations gathered for further Ofcom investigation to trace the subscribers;
and nine letters of warning sent to night clubs that have advertised events on illegal radio stations.

Illegal broadcasting causes interference to the radios used by critical safety of life services such as the London Fire Brigade and National Air Traffic Services (NATS). The problem is most acute in London which accounts for more than 50% of the estimated 150 illegal broadcasters operating in the UK.

There is a direct link between some illegal broadcasters and serious crime. Ofcom raids on the studios of illegal broadcasters have uncovered drugs and weapons, including firearms. In some cases the cash raised through advertising events at nightclubs is used to finance the purchase of drugs for sale at these events.

Illegal broadcasting also causes interference to legitimate radio stations, denying hundreds of thousands of listeners the opportunity to hear their favourite programmes.

Robert Thelen-Bartholomew, Ofcom's Head of Field Operations, said:
"Illegal broadcasting affects safety of life services and has links with serious crime. Ofcom will continue to pursue and prosecute those involved in this criminal activity."

Ofcom has a duty under Section 3 of the Communications Act 2003 to secure optimal use for wireless telegraphy of the electro-magnetic spectrum.

The Ofcom operation has resulted in 44 London illegal broadcasters going off air since the start of the operation. Between 25 October and 1 November (four days into the operation) Ofcom's unmanned monitoring station in London recorded a 57% drop in the number of illegal broadcasts being made. The operation involved 18 Ofcom field operations staff working with 32 Metropolitan Police officers.

John Anthony, London Fire Brigade Assistant Commissioner, said:
"Pirate radio transmissions interfere with, and sometimes entirely disable, the communications systems the London Fire Brigade relies on. The interference makes it more difficult for the fire fighters to go about their daily business of protecting Londoners."

A spokesman for NATS, said: "Unauthorised broadcasts on or close to frequencies used by air traffic controllers can interfere with the passing of vital information between air traffic controllers and pilots. They can also affect the navigation aids used as landmarks. NATS has very strong working relationship with Ofcom who act promptly to take enforcement action when any interference with air traffic control is detected."

Paul Brown, Chief Executive of the Commercial Radio Companies Association, said: "Commercial Radio provides properly regulated, socially responsible content to its 31 million listeners. Pirate radio broadcasters pay no copyright or licence fees yet they take revenue from commercial radio stations all of whom fulfil the terms of detailed licence conditions and who generate jobs and revenue in their transmission areas. CRCA therefore welcomes today's announcement of Ofcom's London initiative."

The illegal broadcasters targeted by the Ofcom operation include:-

Station Location Action
Afrique FM Tottenham & Wood Green 2 transmitters seized
Baseline FM Lewisham 1 transmitter seized
Blues FM Peckham 3 transmitters seized
Bounce FM Streatham 2 transmitters seized
1 transmitter disconnected
Déjà vu Bow 1 transmitter seized
Force FM Harold Hill 1 transmitter seized
Freeze FM Harrow 1 transmitter seized
Fresh FM Erith 1 transmitter disconnected
Galaxy FM Peckham 2 transmitters seized
Genesis FM Rotherhithe 2 transmitters seized
1 transmitter disconnected
Have it FM Bow 1 transmitter seized
HFM Rotherhithe 1 transmitter disconnected
House FM Clapton 2 transmitters disconnected
Itch FM Whitechapel 1 transmitter seized
Kool FM Wapping 1 transmitter disconnected
Lightning FM Brixton Hill 3 transmitters seized
Lush FM Acton 1 transmitter seized
N Power Honor Oak 2 transmitters seized
Naija FM Plumstead & Wapping 1 transmitter seized
1 transmitter disconnected
Nitro FM Tulse Hill 1 transmitter seized
On Top FM Kennington & Stockwell 1 transmitter seized
1 studio raid
Powerjam Battersea 1 transmitter seized
Ragga FM Edmonton 1 transmitter seized
Rasta FM Kennington 1 transmitter seized
Rhythm FM Dalston 1 transmitter seized
Rinse FM Wapping 1 transmitter disconnected
Rude FM Holloway & Crouch End 4 transmitters disconnected
Select UK FM Rotherhithe 2 transmitters seized
1 transmitter disconnected
Shine FM Clerkenwell 1 transmitter seized
Silk FM Norwood 1 transmitter seized
1 transmitter disconnected
SLR Tottenham 2 transmitters seized
Subjam Wood Green 1 transmitter seized
Supreme FM Leyton 1 transmitter seized
Surprise FM Peckham 1 transmitter seized
Sweet FM Edmonton 2 transmitters seized
Touch FM Whitechapel 1 transmitter seized
Unidentified Stockwell 1 transmitter seized
Unknown FM Edmonton & Holloway 2 transmitters seized
1 transmitter disconnected
Vibes FM Brixton Hill 3 transmitters seized
Vision FM Limehouse 1 transmitter seized
Wax FM Plumstead 1 transmitter seized
WBLS Tottenham 1 transmitter disconnected
Whoa FM Elephant and Castle 2 transmitters seized
Y2K Holloway 1 transmitter seized

2K Klimax!

12 November 2003

A man involved in the operation of a Hackney-based pirate radio station calling itself, Klimax FM, was convicted at Thames Magistrates Court on Friday 7 November.

Keith Anthony Clark, aged 38, of Chingford Road, Walthamstow, pleaded guilty to charges brought against him under Section 1C of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to providing services to assist in the operation of a pirate radio station.

Mr Clark who pleaded guilty to the charges, received a £2,000 fine, and was ordered to pay costs of £2,480. Equipment and records used by the station were ordered forfeit by the court.

The successful prosecution followed a raid of the studio in Wick Road, Homerton, on 7 May 2003 following a complaint from the London Borough of Hackney.

Moody Pirate Burglars

30 October 2003

A man involved in the operation of a Lambeth-based pirate radio station Bounce FM was convicted at South Western Magistrates Court on Monday 27 October.

Andrew Neil Richard Moody, aged 18, of Queenstown Road, Battersea, pleaded guilty to charges brought against him under Section 1 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the installation of equipment for the operation of a pirate radio station.

Mr Moody pleaded guilty and received a two-year conditional discharge and was ordered to pay costs of £550.

The successful prosecution followed the police being called to an address in Crown Lane, Streatham to investigate suspected burglars on the premises.

Peckham Pirate

24 October 2003

A man involved in the operation of a Southwark-based pirate radio station Flashback FM has been convicted at Camberwell Green Magistrates Court on Monday, 6 October.

Wayne Gregory Riley, aged 24, of Choumert Road, Peckham, pleaded guilty to charges brought against him under Section 1 and 1C of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the operation of a pirate radio station, and supplying equipment for illegal broadcast.

Mr Riley pleaded guilty and received a one year conditional discharge and was ordered to pay costs of £250.

The successful prosecution followed a raid in Overhill Road, East Dulwich in August 2003.

Risky Poisoned Challis

14 October 2003

The Radiocommunications Agency has successfully prosecuted a Bedford man for making unauthorised broadcasts contrary to Section 1 of the Wireless Telegraph Act 1949.

Kevin Michael Challis, 34, of Woburn Road, Bedford pleaded guilty to participating in the operation of an unauthorised broadcasting station calling itself Risk FM, when he appeared before Bedford Magistrates’ Court on 9 October 2003. Mr Challis was given a 12 month conditional discharge and ordered to pay costs of £1000.

In November 2002, officers from the Radiocommunications Agency monitored unlicenced transmissions by RISK FM. They subsequently executed a search warrant on a Flat at Woburn Road, Bedford where a complete pirate radio-broadcasting studio was found.

The defendant who was among others present in the flat was interviewed and admitted to being responsible for the setting up of the station and participating in unauthorised broadcasts using the DJ name ‘KC’.

Equipment seized was ordered forfeit.

Expensive Flashback for Mark Anthony

11 September 2003

A man involved in the operation of a Southwark based pirate radio station calling itself Flashback FM has been convicted at Camberwell Green Magistrates Court.

Mark Anthony Ramsey, aged 25, of Rangefield Road, Bromley, on Tuesday 9 September, pleaded guilty to charges brought against him under Section 1 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the operation of a pirate radio station, and supplying records for illegal broadcast.

Mr Ramsey pleaded guilty and received a £200 fine and had costs of £1,500 awarded against him.

The successful prosecution followed a raid on the premises in Sylvan Grove, Camberwell, by staff of the Radiocommunications Agency accompanied by Police Officers, in May 2003.

Frost Inspected

11 September 2003

A man involved in the operation of a St Albans based pirate radio station calling itself Hectic FM has been convicted at St Albans Magistrates Court.

Emile Frost, aged 20, of Telford Court, Alma Road, St Albans, pleaded guilty to charges brought against him under Section 1 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the unauthorised broadcast and management of a pirate radio station.

Mr Frost pleaded guilty and received a £300 fine, had to pay costs of £150, and the court ordered forfeiture of all seized equipment.

The successful prosecution followed complaints by residents close to the transmission source, which led to a raid by officers from the Radiocommunications Agency in July 2003.

Frozen Pirates Sunk

15 July 2003

Two Harrow men involved in the operation of a pirate radio station in West London have been convicted at Harrow Magistrates Court.

The pirate radio station, calling itself Freeze FM, was the source of frequent radio interference in parts of West London.

On 9 July, Ricky Valentine of Headstone Road, Harrow, and John Anthony Manning of Hillside Road, Harrow, pleaded guilty to charges brought against them under Section 1 of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949. Mr Valentine received a fine totalling £3,000, and had costs of £1,000 awarded against him for offences including the unlicenced use of radio equipment. Mr Manning received a £750 fine and had costs of £500 awarded against him for the unlicenced use of radio equipment.

The court ordered forfeiture of all seized equipment.

Jesse James Off The Air

25 June 2003

An East London man was convicted by Brent Magistrates Court on 23 June 2003 of offences under Section 1C of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, for participating in the operation of a pirate radio station calling itself Roots FM 95.4.

Paul Jesse James, 44, of Balmore Close, Findhorn Street, London E14 pleaded guilty to the charges brought against him and was fined £500 with costs of £500 awarded against him.

In October 2002, at the Alpha Business Centre, Willesden, London, NW10, Radiocommunications Officers caught Paul Jesse James acting as a DJ and using equipment on pirate radio station Roots FM. Radio equipment was seized and Mr James later admitted the offences when questioned.

The court ordered that the seized equipment be forfeited.

Davis Done

25 June 2003

A West London director was convicted by Brent Magistrates Court on Monday 23 June 2003, for his involvement in the operation of two pirate radio stations broadcasting throughout North and North-West London, and calling themselves Roots FM 95.4 and Street FM 94.4.

Matthew Davis, 35, of Clophill, Bedfordshire, pleaded guilty on 23 June 2003 to the charges brought against him under Section 1B of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, for offences relating to allowing premises to be used for unlawful broadcasting. Mr Davis was fined £800 with costs of £802.76 awarded against him.

Mr Davis was prosecuted following investigations by the Radiocommunications Agency in October 2002.

The court ordered seized equipment be forfeited.

C U Jimmy!

6 May 2003

A pirate broadcaster transmitting from an address in Barrhead was fined £300 following conviction at Paisley Sheriff Court on April 25.

David Pattison (18) pled guilty to charges brought against him under Section 1C of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949 and the Broadcasting Act 1990 relating to the installation and use equipment without a licence, and in the participation in the operation of an unlicensed broadcasting radio station - Mad Wae It FM.

Following an anonymous tip-off, Officers from the Radiocommunications Agency traced unlicensed transmissions on 21 July 2002, to Langton Crescent, Barrhead.
Paisley Sheriff Court granted a search warrant and equipment was seized.

The court ordered that seized equipment be forfeited.

Choker for Coker

4 March 2003

An Essex man involved with a pirate radio station has been convicted at Southend on sea Magistrates Court.

Anthony John Coker of Meteor Road, Westcliff on Sea, Essex pleaded guilty on 3 March 2003, to charges brought against him under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the supply of sound recordings and operation of the pirate radio station Premier FM. He was given a one year conditional discharge and had costs of £150 awarded against him.

The prosecution followed the execution of a search warrant in Britannia Road, Westcliff on sea, where the defendant was found operating the station.

The court also ordered forfeiture of all the seized equipment, including a transmitter and records.

Passion Killers

21 Februray 2003

An Essex man involved with the promotion of a pirate radio station has been convicted at Havering Magistrates Court.

Kyri Marcou (28) of Hillside Avenue, Woodford Green, Essex pleaded guilty on 14 February 2003, to charges brought against him under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, of promoting, and advertising the north London pirate radio station Passion FM.

Marcou produced advertising material at Reddon Court Road in Romford.
He was fined £1200 and had costs of £1000 awarded against him.

The court stated that by advertising Passion and associating it with events at particular clubs he made personal financial gain at the expense of licenced broadcasting stations. The defendant pleaded guilty.

No Joy for Baggot

12 February 2003

A Guildford man involved with a pirate radio station has been convicted at Guildford Magistrates Court.

Leigh James Baggott of Briarwood Road, St Johns, Woking, Surrey pleaded guilty on 06 February 2003, to charges brought against him under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the operation of the pirate radio station N-Joi. He had costs of £250 awarded against him and was ordered to pay a fine of £150.

The prosecution followed an operation on 12 July 2002 where broadcasting equipment was seized from a garden shed in Worplesdon Road, Guildford. The operation was a culmination of several months of investigation and monitoring of the station. The main transmitter was being installed on the Sunnydown cellphone mast at weekends and ran the risk of radio interference to aircraft radio communications.

The court also ordered forfeiture of all the seized equipment, including two radio transmitters, record decks and mixers.

DTI Film Unit "in the groove"!

7 February 2003

An Oldbury man, who was filmed installing equipment in Clent Court, Dudley, for an unlicensed radio station calling itself Groove FM, appeared before Dudley Magistrates’ Court on Friday 31st January.

Ryan Neil Evans (aged 27) of Kendal House, Shelsey Avenue, Oldbury entered a guilty plea to the charge brought against him under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to installing a transmitter for unlicensed radio broadcasts by a pirate radio station. He was given a conditional discharge for 18 months and ordered to pay £250 costs.

Officers from the Radiocommunications Agency had traced unlicensed transmissions to Clent Court and filmed Evans installing a transmitter.

£450 each Unloaded

30 January 2003

Four West London men involved with a pirate radio station have been convicted at Brentford Magistrates Court.

Adrian Toussant of Townholm Crescent Hanwell, Jason Knight of Dartington House, Senior Street, Woodchester Square and Paul O’Silva of Royle Crescent, Ealing all pleaded guilty on 24 January 2003, to charges brought against them under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the operation of the pirate radio station Reload 87.9FM. Mark Barker of Brentslea, Brentford, Middlesex, also pleaded guilty to the same charges on 13 December 02. They each had costs awarded against them of £450 in total and were given conditional discharges of between 12 and 18 months.

The court also ordered forfeiture of all the seized equipment.

Up The (180 foot) Pole!

31 January 2003

Two pirate operators were convicted at Camberwell Magistrates Court on 27th January 2003 for offences under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949.

Jason Fisher of Priestwood House, Drummond Road, Rotherhithe, London, SE16 and Michael Pruce of Philip Walk, Peckham, London, SE15, both 23, were each given 18 months conditional discharges and ordered to pay £150 costs after being found guilty of participating in the running of a pirate radio station calling itself Essence FM.

On 28 September last, the two defendants were caught at the top of a 180ft-cell phone aerial with tools and radio transmitting apparatus. When questioned they stated they were enjoying the aerial views. However, they subsequently admitted the offences when interviewed. The court ordered the seized equipment be forfeited.

16 Year Old Pirate Arrested

23 January 2003

A juvenile from South Glamorgan who operated a ‘pirate’ radio station without a licence has been convicted.

The 16-year-old juvenile (who cannot be named for legal reasons) was arrested following Radiocommunications Agency investigations into a pirate station calling itself Garage FM and broadcasting from premises in, Penarth. The juvenile pleaded guilty to using radio apparatus without a licence, contrary to section 1(1) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949. He was ordered to pay costs of £250 and referred to a Youth Offending Team. The case was heard at Barry Magistrates Court on the 20th of January 2003.

The court heard that the youth had been arrested whilst broadcasting on pirate radio station Garage FM, which transmitted to the Cardiff, Newport and Bristol areas. Officers of the Radiocommunications Agency accompanied by Police Officers executed a search warrant on the premises on 27 June 2002 and subsequently, interviewed the juvenile.

The court ordered that the transmitting equipment be forfeited.

Not So Kool

23 January 2003

Three pirate broadcasters, involved with an unlicensed broadcasting station in Ladywood, Birmingham, were some of the nine defendants scheduled to appear before Birmingham Magistrates' Court on Friday 17th January.

Russell John Glover (25) of Bucklands End Lane, Hodge Hill, Lee Bates (30) of Rivington Crescent, Kingstanding and Scott Gerrard Molloy (25) of Earlsbury Gardens, Perry Barr, who pleaded gulity to the unlicensed use of telegraphy apparatus, were each given an 18 month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £200 towards prosecution costs.

Anamaria Gibbons (32) and Jason Ball (30) of Dovecote Close Tipton, Liam Eversley (20) of Newhope Close, Lee Bank and Randip Singh Pandhal (23) of Meschines Street, Coventry pleaded not gulity to charges in connection with unlicensed broadcasting. Gibbons, Ball and Eversley were remanded until 14th March for pre-trial review while Pandhal elected Crown Court Trial.

Timothy St. Prix (35) of Sandringham Road, Perry Barr and Justin Steele (27) of Newhope Close and Lee Bank did not attend court and their cases were adjourned until 31st January.

Unlicensed transmissions were traced to Bishopsgate House, Ladywood, so a search warrant, granted by Birmingham Magistrates' Court was executed by officers from the Radiocommunications Agency accompanied by police officers.

On the first floor, two complete pirate radio stations were discovered, one transmitting as Kool FM, the other broadcasting as Sweet FM. The equipment was seized by officers from Radiocommunications Agency.

Glover and Bates were on the premises and during interview admitted to being disc jockeys on the pirate radio station Kool FM. Molloy was subsequently traced and when interviewed also admitted being a disc jockey on Kool FM.

Monitoring of Kool FM transmissions has already led to the seizure of 22 illegal transmitters that have been responsible for interference to radio stations as far afield as Leicester. Non-compliant or inferior quality equipment used by unlicensed stations can result in interference to other radio users, including that of the aeronautical and emergency services.

Spades Tagged

20 November 2002

Bradley Carlyle Hilt of Wheatcroft Grove, Rainham, Kent, and Sergey Bokuchava of Lords View, St Johns Wood Road, Paddington, are the first pirate broadcasters to be electronically tagged for Wireless Telegraphy Act offences.

Police officers were called to a building in Old Ford Road E3 in January of this year. The defendants were found on the roof with apparatus to set up an aerial and transmitter for their pirate station, Voice of Africa. Both answered “no comment” in interviews. Special warnings were administered, allowing the court to draw inferences.

Both had entered not guilty pleas but were found guilty at a previous hearing and appeared at Thames Magistrates Court on 18 November for sentence. Hilt and Bokuchava have to serve a 28 day curfew in which they must remain at home between the hours of 21:30 and 06:30. The curfew is administered by the use of electronic tags. They were each ordered to pay £250 costs and given a 40-hour Community Punishment Order. The court also ordered forfeiture of all the seized equipment.

Powerjam Silenced!

20 November 2002

Dave Antoine of Ainsworth Avenue, Bolton was convicted of offences under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949 at Trafford Magistrates Court on 7 November.

During December 2001, officers from the Radiocommunications Agency had monitored the transmissions of a radio station calling itself “POWERJAM”, on a frequency of 103.5 MHz. The station was transmitting illegally.

In February, officers from the Radiocommunications Agency traced the source of the transmissions to an address at Ayres Road in the Old Trafford area of Manchester.

Mr Antoine was found hiding in the cellar area. He was interviewed about his presence in the house and more significantly, being in the cellar. He declined to satisfactorily provide any reasons for his behaviour. The search revealed that the cellar had been converted into a broadcasting studio and all equipment was seized.

Mr Antoine, 33, pleaded guilty to unlicensed use of wireless telegraphy apparatus and was given a six-month conditional discharge and ordered to forfeit all the equipment.

Phat Man Guilty

21 November 2002

Michael Kyriakos Christou of Brunswick Grove N14 pleaded guilty at Haringey Magistrates on 19 November to charges brought against him under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949.

Christou was caught on 18 May by police officers on the roof of Chettle Court in Ridge Road N8. He was in possession of a transmitter and keys, and was charged with offences related to the installation and supply of broadcasting apparatus for use by the pirate radio station PHAT 107.4FM.

Christou was given a one year conditional discharge and has been ordered to pay £100 court costs by Haringey Magistrates. The transmitter and other items were ordered forfeit.

"Illegal" Pirate Website

11th October 2002

The Radiocommunications Agency has successfully prosecuted a Hull man for publishing details of pirate radio broadcasts contrary to the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949.

A Hull man pleaded guilty to his involvement in publishing a website that gave details of unauthorised broadcasts made by the pirate radio station Pure FM.

The defendant received a 12 month conditional discharge and was ordered to pay total costs of £500.

Agency staff monitored the website and interviewed the defendant under caution.

Margate Sweet FM

4th October 2002

Three Kent men have been fined £250 each for facilitating the operation of a pirate radio station after pleading not guilty at Margate Magistrates Court on 26 September 2002.

Michael Stemp (18) of Elham Close, Margate, and Russell Babbington (22) of Athelstan Road, Cliftonville, pleaded not guilty to charges brought against them under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, relating to the operation of the pirate radio station Sweet FM.

Peter Bernard (29) of Appledore Close, Margate, also pleaded not guilty but did not attend court and the trial proceeded in his absence.

All three men were convicted and ordered to pay the sum of £250. In addition Peter Bernard was ordered to pay £938 in respect of costs. Equipment seized was ordered forfeit.

The men were detained by police on 18 February 2002 when found on private premises. They were subsequently interviewed by Radiocommunications Agency officers concerning maintaining equipment for Sweet FM.

Ragga Muffin!

5.08 2002

A man from Bristol who broadcasted a 'pirate' radio station across the city without a licence has been fined for his offences.

Martin Henderson of Holroyd House, Somerset Terrace in the Windmill Hill area of Bristol, admitted making unlawful broadcasts using the station name 'Ragga FM'. Radiocommunications Agency officers monitored 'Ragga FM' transmissions on several occasions leading to 9 September 2001, when a search warrant was executed on Mr Henderson's premises. As a result, Mr Henderson was prosecuted at Bristol Magistrates Court on Tuesday (30 July).

Mr Henderson (30) was charged with two offences under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949 in relation to permitting premises he was in charge of to be used for unlawful broadcasts, and using apparatus for wireless telegraphy without a licence.

He was fined £100 for each charge and was ordered to contribute £300 towards prosecution costs. In addition, a forfeiture order was made for a number of items including a transmitter, a mini disc player, a tape deck and a mixer unit, which was said in court to be valued at £3,500.

Other relevant information accepted in court included that Mr Henderson is currently in receipt of state benefits.

Not Quite Perfecto!

18.06.2002

A pirate broadcaster operating from an address in Johnstone was on Thursday (June 13) fined £250 after pleading guilty at Paisley Sheriff Court.

David Bridson pled guilty to charges brought against him under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949 relating to the installation of radio equipment without a licence, and facilitating operation of the pirate radio station Perfecto Radio.

Officers from the Radiocommunications Agency traced unlicenced transmissions on 10 October 2001 to Maple Drive, Johnstone.

A search warrant granted by Paisley Sheriff Court was executed and equipment was seized by the Radiocommunications Agency.

The court ordered that the seized equipment - a transmitter, two turntables, one mixer and a cellphone be forfeited.

Dodgy FM Pioneering Internet link!

14.05.2002

Peter James Allridge, 24, of Belmont Drive, Chorley, was convicted at Chorley Magistrates Court on 8 May of using unlicensed broadcast radio equipment.

He admitted receiving transmissions from the Internet and broadcasting them
over the Chorley area. This is the first case brought by the Radiocommunications Agency where an Internet link had been used to source music for transmission.

Mr Allridge was given a 12 month conditional discharge and ordered to pay
£100 costs after pleading guilty to an offence under Section 1(1) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949. He was also ordered to forfeit all his broadcasting equipment to the Radiocommunications Agency.

Officers from the Radiocommunications Agency were on duty in the Chorley
area on 18 November 2001 when they monitored illegal radio transmissions from a station identifying itself as 'Dodgy FM' on a frequency of 106.5Mhz. These were traced to an address in Belmont Drive.

A warrant was obtained for this address and executed on 15 December. In an
upstairs bedroom officers found equipment that was transmitting on 106.5Mhz. The equipment comprised a computer which was receiving transmissions through the Internet, and this in turn was linked to a transmitter, which broadcast the programme over the Chorley area.

In a subsequent interview, Peter James Allridge admitted assembling the
equipment and re-transmitting the broadcast from the computer over the Chorley area on 106.5Mhz. He also admitted not having a licence to broadcast on the frequency.

LPWS NOTE: This is a fine idea if you have cable or broadband, you can set up a high speed link to feed the signal to the transmitter in sufficient quality for re-broadcast. This protects your studio and record collection etc. Well done Peter!!

Still on the run? People's Choice

28.01.2002

A man from Southampton has been fined £150 for operating a pirate radio station after pleading guilty at Southampton Magistrates court on Tuesday 22 January.

Hue McClean, 44, of Coxford Drive, Maybush, Southampton was convicted under section 1 (1) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949 for illegally broadcasting his pirate radio station "Peoples Choice" at Millbank House, Southampton on 16 July 1999.

Mr McClean failed to appear in court on 23 March 2000 and a warrant was served for his arrest. Two co-defendants did appear and were fined a total of £600 plus £300 costs. In addition to the fines the court also ordered the stations seized equipment forfeit.

And previously:-

23.03 2000

Two Southampton men have been fined in connection with the operation of an unlicensed radio station in the city called People's Choice Radio Station (PCRS).

Brian Fenton, 35, of Partridge Road, Southampton was fined £400 plus £200 costs after pleading guilty to a charge of unlicensed broadcasting. Kim Hall, 41, of Radcliffe Road, Southampton, was fined £200 plus £100 costs after pleading guilty to allowing his premises to be used for unlicensed broadcasting. Both men appeared at Southampton Magistrates' Court on 21 March.   In addition to the fines the court also ordered the station's seized equipment forfeit.

Officers of the Radiocommunications Agency had traced PCRS, a persistent pirate station, to Millbank House, Southampton, and an operation was mounted that led to the seizure of the station's equipment and prosecutions for unlicensed broadcasting.

RA Turn Up The Heat (FM)

14.12.2001

A Tottenham man has been fined £1,000 and ordered to pay costs of £60 for his involvement with a pirate radio station after appearing at Highgate Magistrates Court on Monday 10 December 2001.

Christopher Lennon, 20, of Ingleborough Court, High Road, Tottenham pleaded guilty to three charges, under section 1(1) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949, to illegally broadcasting his pirate radio station - Heat FM - between 8 March and 6 September 2001. Equipment seized by the Radiocommunications Agency was ordered forfeit by the court.

Christopher Lennon was present on three separate occasions when RA officials seized Heat FM transmitters illegally sited on the top of Warren Court, Tottenham. The transmitters had resulted in a significant deterioration in the quality of life for local residents, who were forced to do without lifts for lengthy periods in a high rise block and were constantly being disturbed by the comings and goings of radio pirates. He admitted to RA officials his involvement in the operation of the station. He pleaded guilty to three Wireless Telegraphy Act offences and close involvement in the running of Heat FM over a period of time.

12 Months Probation

A Nottingham man pleaded guilty today to installing and using an unlicensed radio station, broadcasting under the name of MAC FM. Andrew Buck, 29, of Bilbrough Road, Mansfield, admitted to installing and using the equipment to run an unlicensed radio station from his home. On Saturday 17 October 1998, Radiocommunications Agency officers monitored broadcasts by MAC FM and traced them to Mr. Buck's home. On 24 October, 1998, Radiocommunications officers, accompanied by police, executed a search warrant at the premises and discovered a broadcast studio. Mr. Buck was sentenced to 12 months probation and ordered to pay £500 costs.

Man Bites Radio??

Barking Man Convicted of Pirate Broadcasting

Douglas Smith of Parsloes Avenue, Dagenham, has been convicted of aiding the operation of the unauthorised radio station "Conflict FM" which broadcast in Barking, Dagenham and Ilford.
Mr. Smith pleaded guilty at Barking Magistrates' Court on 16 July to unlawful broadcasting of, and allowing his premises to be used by, "Conflict FM".
He was given a conditional discharge for a year with £500 costs. All studio equipment seized was ordered forfeit by the court.
The prosecution followed complaints by the local authority. Radiocommunications Agency staff traced the source of "Conflict FM's" broadcasts to Mr. Smiths home. On 23 January, Agency staff, accompanied by police officers, executed a search warrant at his home and found a broadcast studio inside.

80 hours plus £500 for Holloway Pirate

Holloway Man Convicted of Pirate Broadcasting

Victor Smith of Paultney Street, Miranda Estate, Holloway has been convicted of operating the unauthorised radio station "Station FM". which broadcast in North East London.
Mr. Smith pleaded guilty at Snaresbrook Crown Court on 20 July to unlawful broadcasting.
He was given 80 hours of community service with £500 costs. All studio equipment seized was ordered forfeit by the court.
The prosecution followed investigation by Radiocommunications Agency staff who traced the source of "Station FM" broadcasts to a house in Seven Sisters Road, Finsbury Park. On 16 November last year, Agency staff, accompanied by police officers, executed a search warrant at the premises and found a broadcast studio inside, and Mr Smith broadcasting.

RA "Passion Killers"

17 August 1999

A Bristol man who broadcast as a DJ on the pirate radio station, 'Passion FM', was yesterday conditionally discharged for one year at Bristol Magistrates' Court.
A raid by Radiocommunications officers on May 1 at Croydon House, Easton, found Daniel Robert Lloyd Myers (25) using equipment to broadcast illegally. The equipment was seized. The action followed a complaint to the Radiocommunications Agency. Mr. Myers, of Bonnington Walk, Lockleaze, pleaded guilty to using the equipment. He was given conditional discharge for one year and was ordered to pay costs of £475. The broadcast equipment was ordered to be forfeited. Credit was given for the guilty plea.

Computer "interrogated" After Raid

19 August 1999

A Nottingham man pleaded guilty today to running a 'pirate' radio station, 'Scene FM', and a further two men, also from Nottingham, pleaded guilty to illegal broadcasts.
Santiago Carlos Medrano, aged 27, of Gresley Drive, Sneinton, Nottinghamshire, already had a conviction for installing equipment for the unlicensed station, 'Scene FM', for which he received a conditional discharge back in October 1997.
Mr. Medrano was given a sentence of 40 hours' community service and he forfeited all items of equipment which he had stated he owned. He was also ordered to pay £250 costs. He also pleaded guilty to advertising on Scene FM and advertising the station.

The other two defendants, Simon White, aged 33, of Mansfield Road, Nottingham and Mark Andrew Hadley, aged 20, of Tudor Grove, Nottingham acted as DJs for the pirate radio station and supplied equipment, including the records played on air.
Both defendants were conditionally discharged for two years. Mr. White was ordered to pay £250 costs and Mr. Hadley £100 costs.
The prosecutions were brought by the Radiocommunications Agency, an Executive Agency of the Department of Trade and Industry.

Mr. Barry Maxwell, Director for the Radiocommunications Agency said:-
"The Agency vigorously pursues those responsible for unlicensed broadcasting because of the real threat these stations pose to other radio users.
The poor quality of their equipment can result in interference to other services outside the FM broadcasting band. Their arbitrary choice of frequency often blocks reception of authorised broadcasters."
The illegal station first came to the attention of the Radiocommunications Agency in 1997. Radiocommunications Agency officers subsequently isolated the source of the link transmissions to an address in Boden Street. Transmissions were monitored and identified as being 'Scene FM'.
On 9 August 1998, Agency officers, accompanied by police officers, executed a search warrant at the address. The defendants Hadley and White were found within the premises.
Subsequent investigations revealed a strong link between Mr. Medrano's business Groove City and 'Scene FM'. A search warrant was executed at Groove City on 8 September 1998, and interrogation of the computer seized confirmed the link with 'Scene FM'.

Birmingham Prosecution

A Birmingham man appeared before Birmingham Magistrates' Court yesterday (27 September 1999) for his role in connection with the pirate radio station 'Sting FM'.

Daniel Douglas from Erdington, Birmingham faced charges brought by the Radiocommunications Agency under the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949. He pleaded guilty to taking part in illegal broadcasting and was given a 12 month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £250 in court costs. All the equipment used in the offence was ordered forfeit. The prosecution follows complaints from legitimate broadcasters. On Wednesday 9 June officers searched a flat at Weston House, Newtown, Birmingham. They found the defendant wearing headphones and holding a microphone in a room converted to a radio studio. As the officers spoke to Douglas the conversation was heard on a nearby portable radio. Studio equipment including a radio transmitter and Radio Data Signalling (RDS) encoder was seized by the officers.

Bury Pirate Broadcaster Convicted

21 December 1999

Thirty two year old Frank McElherron of Woolfield House on Wash Lane in Bury was convicted at Bury Magistrates Court on 16 December of using unlicensed broadcast radio equipment.

He was given a conditional discharge and ordered to pay £100 costs after pleading guilty to an offence under Section 1(1) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949. He was also ordered to forfeit all his broadcasting equipment.

Following complaints from members of the public about pirate radio transmissions, officers of the Radiocommunications Agency monitored transmissions on 12 January 1997 from a station identifying itself as "ITC" on a frequency of 105.5MHz.

Thc transmissions were traced to a tower block in the Darn Hill area of Bury and further investigations revealed that the main transmitter was being controlled via a radio link which was traced using direction finding equipment to Mr McElherron's home address at the time on Fairfield Drive in Bury.

Agency officers visited the premises and when invited inside by Mr McElherron, they found transmitting equipment consistent with the operation of a pirate radio station which was seized in evidence.

Mr McElherron subsequently failed to appear in court for the initial hearing relating to these matters on 19 June 1997 and as a consequence a warrant for his arrest was issued. He was brought to court this month after recently coming to police attention.

Pirate gets away light!  £5.00 Fine!!

15 December 1999

Adrian Cardoza of Boundaries Road, Balham, has been convicted of providing equipment and records for a pirate radio station known as 'Delight'. The illegal 'Delight' transmitted across the South London area.

Mr Cardoza pleaded guilty to the charge on 13 December 1999 at South Westem Magistrates Court. He was given a six month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £5 costs. The broadcasting equipment and records seized were ordered forfeit by the court.

The prosecution followed an investigation by the Radiocommunications Agency. On the 17 July 1999, Agency staff, accompanied by police officers raided an address in Holcroft House, Darrien Road, Battersea and found a broadcast studio inside. Records and equipment were consequently seized and Mr Cardoza was interviewed.
This is music to our ears, the DTI/RIS men must have been seething!

Punch "Up The Bracket" For The RA!

13th March 2000

James Everett Pavitt, 20, of Whitehall Road, Grays, and Deri Stephens, 21, of Wood View, Grays, have been convicted of assault following investigations by Radiocommunications Agency officers into an Essex pirate radio station.

Grays Magistrates Court (13 March) was told that Radiocommunications Agency officers were involved in investigating Syndicate FM which Transmitted in the area of Grays, Basildon and Dagenham. They traced its whereabouts to Keir Hardy House, Milford Road, Grays, Essex.

On 8 January 2000 the officers recovered a radio transmitter from the roof area of Keir Hardy House. On leaving the building the two officers were confronted by Stephens and Pavitt who demanded the return of the transmitter.

The officers refused, and the court heard that Stephens and Pavitt began to physically obstruct and threaten the officers. Stephens then pulled the transmitter from the officers' grasp, injuring the hands of Mr Peter Goodin in the process, then he and Pavitt ran away. After police enquiries, Stephens and Pavitt were arrested in a nearby property.

Both men pleaded guilty in court to assaulting Mr Goodin. They were each given 18 hours community service in an attendance centre, and were ordered to pay £50 compensation each and costs of £55 were awarded against each of them.

Nottingham "City FM" closed

30.03.99

A Nottingham man was yesterday convicted of operating an unlicensed radio station from his home in Netherfield, broadcasting under the name of City FM.

David Griffiths of Meadow Cottages, Netherfield appeared at Nottingham Magistrates Court having previously pleaded guilty to unlicensed radio transmission and management of an unlicensed broadcast radio station. Radiocommunications Agency officers traced broadcasts by City FM to Mr Griffiths home address and on 9 November 1999, accompanied by police, executed a search warrant at the premises and found broadcast studio and transmitter equipment which they seized. Tests showed the equipment was capable of broadcasting on various frequencies reaching as far North as Lincoln and as far East as Grantham.

Mr Griffiths was sentenced to serve a 120 hour community service order and ordered to pay £200 towards prosecution costs. the equipment used for transmitting was ordered forfeit.

"UK Radio" closed after 23 years!!

A Bilston man was fined £250 costs and given a 12-month conditional discharge at Wolverhampton Magistrates' Court on April 3rd, 2000 for using radio equipment in contravention of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949.
The prosecution against Roy John Wedge, aged 39 of Prouds Lane Bilston was brought by the Radiocommunications Agency.
Wedge pleaded guilty on two charges of illegal broadcasting. The court approved an application from the Agency for the forfeiture of all seized goods, amounting to £l,500 of equipment.
The pirate station known as UK Radio began its transmissions as far back as 1977. Broadcasting on the short, AM and FM wave bands, sometimes simultaneously.
The Radiocommunications Agency became aware of the illegal broadcasts in 1989, but because of their irregularity, were unable to pinpoint exactly where they came from. As part of their enquiries, they searched Wedge's home on November 28th and found documents and equipment relating to the station.
Roy John Wedge pleaded guilty to the following charges:
a) That he participated in the Management of an unlicensed radio broadcast station in contravention of Section 1 (C) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act of 1949.
b) That he broadcast using radio equipment in contravention of Section 1 (A) of the Wireless Telegraphy Act 1949.

LPWS NOTE: The DTI claim that this station was broadcasting as far back as 1977 would make Roy Wedge only 16 when he started, we say "Bloody well done mate" or is this another case of the DTI "Dirty Tricks" department at work?

 
 
      "Wicked" Willy Bodwen ex Sgt. 3116 (forced to retire & not a laughing policeman!)

The Laughing Policeman Wireless Society is a non-profit organisation for the furtherance of amateur radio.
With annual turnover of less then GBP £1000, LPWS qualifies for UK Charitable Status.

Access to, and use of this web site is subject to these Terms of use

Email G8ASO